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It’s not exactly the easiest subject to talk about, it? Regardless of your target audience we aren’t really talking about a conversation about the other parts of life you learn about in schools.

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I mean, you would worry that a primary school level the kids wouldn’t understand everything and that a secondary/sixth form sort of age you’d sit there thinking ‘they could well know more than me here…’ when it comes to pornography and sex.

On balance, not an easy position to be in.

Recently it came out in the news that some teachers in schools are effectively taking on the role of parents when it comes to sex education.  The BBC published a story of a primary school in North Lincolnshire teaching children about what is and what isn’t deemed acceptable.  The school kids were shown drawings of different situations and were given a thumbs up or thumbs down to demonstrate what was good/bad.

I personally was a little surprised by this.  Immediately it begins to pose more questions in my head than it probably should.  I, of course, understand the need to educate children on such topics.  As the teacher operating the lessons, Lynnette Smith, said “There is a point to this.  Knowledge and understanding can keep a child safe… Paedophiles will avoid an educated child.”  I can’t really argue with that theory.  If a child knows what is right and then wrong then naturally that will help keep them safe.

However, it does appear from what was being said and taught that this extends far beyond trying to keep a child safe.  It does almost come across as a lesson in lifestyle… Which to me seems to learn towards ideology.  I mean, suddenly you have teacher’s views and school policy blurring the facts.  Imagine a highly religious school trying to teach this sort of thing – the children would find themselves under a lot of pressure to think and act in a very certain way (that is not a criticism of religion or religious schools, just a concern that somewhere along the line modern life might well clash.)

The keeping safe idea is completely understandable.  Schools have that duty of care to think about and if that can be helped along in the class then so be it.  But surely the lifestyle-type choices are a personal matter, or at least for parents to help with?  Certainly I’m not expecting children of that age to fully understand everything concerning sex.  However, I personally would prefer it coming from parents.  Schools can help that too, without being patronising or condescending.  I just genuinely feel that a more family-oriented part of this education would work better.

As kids get older then obviously things change in their lives that may dictate different conversations.    I think this becomes more of a family thing again as certainly in my eyes it would be easier to talk to a parent and discuss certain issues.

What is your opinion concerning this?  Why not say what you think, in the comments?

 

 

 

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